Released on 30 July 2015.

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Three Moments of an Explosion: Stories

3.62 based on 1937 ratings & 377 reviews on Goodreads.com

2016 Runner-up

Edge Hill Short Story Prize

Synopsis

The multi-award-winning China Miéville has been called 'the equal of David Mitchell or Zadie Smith' (Scotland on Sunday), a writer whose 'inventiveness and precision is awesome' (Independent), and who writes with 'an imagination of immense power' (Guardian).

In these twenty-eight short stories, glistening icebergs float above urban horizons; a burning stag runs wild through the city; the ruins of industry emerge unsteadily from the sea; and the abandoned generations in a decayed space-elevator look not up at the stars but down at the Earth. Ranging from portraits of childhood to chilling ghost stories, from dystopian visions to poignant evocations of uncanny love, with beautiful prose and melancholy wit, Three Moments of an Explosion is a breath-taking collection that poses searching questions of what it is to be human in an unquiet world. It is a humane and unsentimental investigation of our society, our world, and ourselves.

In the media

Horror, noir, fantasy, politics, and poetry swirl into combinations as satisfying intellectually as they are emotionally. Miéville (Railsea, 2012, etc.) has a habit of building his narratives by taking a metaphor, often about a political or social issue, and asking what would happen if it were literally true . . . In less-capable hands, this method might result in mere gags or dead horses endlessly beaten. (Good thing this isn't a Miéville story, or you'd be wiping off bits of rotten horseflesh.) In Miéville's hands it ranges from clever to profound . . . Bradbury meets Borges, with Lovecraft gibbering tumultuously just out of hearing
Kirkus (Starred Review)
Horror, noir, fantasy, politics, and poetry swirl into combinations as satisfying intellectually as they are emotionally. Miéville (Railsea, 2012, etc.) has a habit of building his narratives by taking a metaphor, often about a political or social issue, and asking what would happen if it were literally true . . . In less-capable hands, this method might result in mere gags or dead horses endlessly beaten. (Good thing this isn't a Miéville story, or you'd be wiping off bits of rotten horseflesh.) In Miéville's hands it ranges from clever to profound . . . Bradbury meets Borges, with Lovecraft gibbering tumultuously just out of hearing
Kirkus (Starred Review)
If anyone doubted whether China Miéville had imagination to burn, proof of his indefatigable creative restlessness is to be found in this collection of short stories . . . This is a bumper collection overflowing with new visions of our beautiful, terrible world.
Metro