The Emperor's Children

2.93 based on 15155 ratings & 2308 reviews on Goodreads.com
Picador

Publication date: 06.04.2007
ISBN: 9780330444484
Number of pages: 592

Synopsis

In Manhattan, just after the century’s turn, three thirty-year-old friends, Danielle, Marina and Julius, are seeking their fortunes. But the arrival of Marina’s young cousin Bootie – fresh from the provinces and keen, too, to make his mark – forces them to confront their own desires and expectations. The Emperor’s Children is a sweeping portrait of one of the most fascinating cities in the world, and a haunting illustration of how the events of a single day can change everything, for ever.

‘Brilliant . . . a masterpiece’

Independent on Sunday

‘Intelligent and unsparing . . . The Emperor’s Children is likely to be one of the most talked-about novels of the autumn . . . Buy two copies; give one to a friend’

The Economist

‘Messud’s prose is a timely and intensely pleasurable reminder of the possibilities of the English language. To use the word clarity about her style – dense, chaste, luminously intelligent – is to return the word to its origins; this is style as illumination, shining a searching yet sympathetic light on the minds and inner worlds of her characters, and as a radiant mode of moral inquiry’

The Times

‘As large-hearted as it is ambitious, this is a novel that combines the old-fashioned art of storytelling with a clear-eyed view of the modern world’

Sunday Times

In the media

A splendid American novel, contemporary yet historical, with an avalanche of characters flowing across the world from Australia to Manhattan to small-town America and to Florida . . . This is an ambitious, confident, most readable book by a first rate storyteller with the youth and vitality to spread a huge canvas and enjoy filling it.
Spectator
Messud has captured a moment, and she has captured it brilliantly . . . Messud has written a big book about the gleaming surfaces of life, and what they conceal. Her ambition - positively nineteenth century, I think - is outweighed only by her talent.
Evening Standard
[The Emperor's Children] demonstrates Ms. Messud's growing range as a writer, her ability to shift gears effortlessly between the comic and the tragic, the satiric and the humane . . . Ms. Messud delineates this Manhattan world with quick, sure, painterly strokes, relying less on Tom Wolfeian status details and obviously satiric vignettes than on her psychological radar for how people talk and behave . . . Ms. Messud does a nimble, quicksilver job of portraying her central characters from within and without - showing us their pretensions, frailties and self-delusions, even as she delineates their secret yearnings and fears. At the same time, she uses their stories to explore many of the same questions she explicated so masterfully in The Last Life - questions about how an individual hammers out an identity of his or her own under the umbrella of a powerful family, questions about the ways in which people mythologize their own lives and the lives of those they love.
New York Times