Released on 21 November 2011.

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The Emperor's Children

2.94 based on 16031 ratings & 2384 reviews on Goodreads.com

2006 Long-listed

Man Booker Prize

Synopsis

In Manhattan, just after the century’s turn, three thirty-year-old friends, Danielle, Marina and Julius, are seeking their fortunes. But the arrival of Marina’s young cousin Bootie – fresh from the provinces and keen, too, to make his mark – forces them to confront their own desires and expectations. The Emperor’s Children is a sweeping portrait of one of the most fascinating cities in the world, and a haunting illustration of how the events of a single day can change everything, for ever.

‘Brilliant . . . a masterpiece’

Independent on Sunday

‘Intelligent and unsparing . . . The Emperor’s Children is likely to be one of the most talked-about novels of the autumn . . . Buy two copies; give one to a friend’

The Economist

‘Messud’s prose is a timely and intensely pleasurable reminder of the possibilities of the English language. To use the word clarity about her style – dense, chaste, luminously intelligent – is to return the word to its origins; this is style as illumination, shining a searching yet sympathetic light on the minds and inner worlds of her characters, and as a radiant mode of moral inquiry’

The Times

‘As large-hearted as it is ambitious, this is a novel that combines the old-fashioned art of storytelling with a clear-eyed view of the modern world’

Sunday Times

In the media

From the moment the book opens, one senses a writer of confidence and maturity, expansive, sure of her ground and savouring her own sonorous prose . . . Messud has proved in her previous novels that she is an intelligent and ambitious writer whose fiction is concerned with matters well beyond the personal and domestic . . . There is much to enjoy here, not least Messud's delicate yet devastating use of irony, her nuanced portrayal of character and motive and her vivid descriptions.
Sunday Telegraph
Messud has captured a moment, and she has captured it brilliantly . . . Messud has written a big book about the gleaming surfaces of life, and what they conceal. Her ambition - positively nineteenth century, I think - is outweighed only by her talent.
Evening Standard
As large-hearted as it is ambitious, this is a novel that combines the old-fashioned art of storytelling with a clear-eyed view of the modern world.
Sunday Times