Released on 10 March 2000.

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We Wish to Inform You That Tomorrow We Will Be Killed With Our Families

4.27 based on 21319 ratings & 1312 reviews on Goodreads.com

1999 Winner

Guardian First Book Award

Synopsis

‘I know few books, fiction or non-fiction, as compelling as Philip Gourevitch’s account of the Rwandan genocide’ Sebastian Junger, author of The Perfect Storm

‘Like the greatest war reporters, Philip Gourevitch raises the human banner in hell’s mouth . . . This volume establishes him as the peer of Michael Herr, there is no limit to what we may expect from him’ Robert Stone

‘Magnificent, terrifying . . . Gourevitch’s account is factual, unemotional – and utterly gut-wrenching . . . The great achievement of his book is that it allows us to imagine this unimaginable crime . . . and those who stood by, human beings all’ Irish Times

‘A sparkling jewel that shone no matter what angle you looked at it from’ Amanda Foreman

‘Gourevitch constructs a powerful indictment against international inaction . . . In his meticulous journalistic reconstruction he drives home the point that this is a history like any other . . . It is also a stark rebuttal of those who have tried to separate what happened in Nazi Germany and what happened in central Africa half a century later’ Observer

‘Philip Gourevitch has written the book which is the key to these dramatic and terrifying events . . . Should be compulsory reading . . . for all UN officials involved in peace-keeping operations and humanitarian aid, from the Secretary General on down’ Guardian

In the media

Magnificent, terrifying . . . Gourevitch's account is factual, unemotional - and utterly gut-wrenching . . . The great achievement of his book is that it allows us to imagine this unimaginable crime . . . and those who stood by, human beings all
Irish Times
Gourevitch constructs a powerful indictment against international inaction . . . In his meticulous journalistic reconstruction he drives home the point that this is a history like any other . . . It is also a stark rebuttal of those who have tried to separate what happened in Nazi Germany and what happened in central Africa half a century later
Observer
Philip Gourevitch has written the book which is the key to these dramatic and terrifying events . . . Should be compulsory reading . . . for all UN officials involved in peace-keeping operations and humanitarian aid, from the Secretary General on down
Guardian