Passages from a Russian schoolgirl's diary, written during the Siege of Leningrad

28 April 2014

By Pan Macmillan

27 November 1941: Today the headmistress came into the classroom in the middle of our literature lesson to announce that there was an artillery raid. We continued the lesson in the air-raid shelter, then it was history, and then according to the timetable it should have been literature again. But the headmistress came back and announced that the air raid was over and we should hurry home.

3 January 1942: Nothing remains for us but to lie down and die … The only thing keeping us alive lately has been bread. We’ve never been denied bread – I mean, up until now bread has always been available ... But it’s already eleven o’clock and there’s no bread in any of the bread shops...

17 February 1942: I’m feeling quite rich. I have millet in one jar, pearl barley in another, buckwheat in yet another, a handful of split peas in a box and 125g of meat on the windowsill.

30 April 1942: I have decided to write my diary in a new format from now on. In the third person. Like a story. So it can be read like a book.

Called 'the Anne Frank of Leningrad' by the Mail on Sunday, this diary of a sixteen-year-old Russian high school student who was living in Leningrad during the Nazi siege will break your heart.