Sarah Rayner's childhood in books, and other things

06 December 2012

Sarah Rayner is the bestselling author of One Moment, One Morning, which has been translated into eleven languages. She worked for twenty years as an advertising copywriter and now writes fiction full time. Here, she talks about her childhood in books, among other things.

 

What would you be if you weren't a writer?

What would I be if I wasn’t a writer? An artist – it’s the only other thing I’m remotely good at. Either that or a professional bon viveur.

What was your favourite book as a child?

0-5, Mrs Tiggy-Winkle. 5-8, The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe. 9-10, The Little House on the Prairie. 11-12, Anne of Green Gables. It’s been downhill ever since.

What is the book you recommend most?

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time

What is your favourite poem?

The Convergence of the Twain by Thomas Hardy

Where do you write? 

In the spare bedroom of my home in Brighton

Can you give one piece of advice to people wanting to become a writer? 

If it’s fiction you want to write, start with short stories. Otherwise it’s like trying to run a marathon without ever having jogged a mile.

Do you read on paper or ebook? 

Paper. I must be one of the only people who’s bought a Kindle and barely used it.

One book that changed your life? 

Frankly, books have been in my life since I was so small I can’t imagine life without them, thus there have been incremental changes made by reading over five decades. I couldn’t possibly narrow it down to one.

One book you have read more than once? 

I read Mrs Tiggywinkle till it fell apart – or rather made my mum do so.

Your worst ever job? 

P.A. to a Fashion P.R. in the 1980s. I was Bubbles to an Edina, Ab Fab style.

What gives you nightmares? 

That job – we were showing the editor of British Vogue round the collections one day when the automatic light went out on the stairs and she trod in dog poo. In her Manolos. Imagine.

Sarah Rayner's first two novels, The Other Half and Getting Even, are now available as ebooks. Read Sarah's blog post about revisiting them after ten years.

 

 

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