LGBT+ Voices: Books about Love

26 June 2017

London Pride is a city wide celebration of the love and diversity of London’s LGBT+ community, taking place from Saturday 24 June to Sunday 9 July 2017. To celebrate the theme for 2017, 'Love Happens Here' we've put together a list of books by LGBT+ voices which explore the experience of love. 


What Belongs to You

What Belongs to You

After a one off meeting in a public bathroom, a charismatic young hustler and an American teacher begin an intimate, intense, and unnerving relationship. What Belongs to You is a powerful and erotic debut novel, which explores how being rejected for being who you are shapes the way you love, and the difficulty of growing up as a gay man in Southern America in the 1990s.  

Winner of 'Debut Book of the Year' at the 2017 British Book Awards

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The Line of Beauty

The Line of Beauty

Alan Hollinghurst's Man Booker winning novel explores themes of identity and class in Thatcher's Britain through the lives of the wealthy Fedden family and their 23 year old lodger Nick. The Line of Beauty lifts the veil on the Conservative elite, and the relationship between politics and sexuality in 1980s London.

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Tipping the Velvet

A coming-of-age story set in the music halls of 19th century London, Sarah Waters's debut novel follows the rise and romances of Nan King, from a music-hall star to a rent boy and East-End 'Tom'.

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Tales of the City

Armistead Maupin’s Tales of the City series follows the lives the LGBT+ community in the hippy heartland of 1970s San Francisco. Centering on Mary Ann Singleton’s arrival from small-town Cleveland and her subsequent San Fransican adventures, these are funny, heartwarming and sometimes tragic stories of awakening, self-discovery and love.

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Carol

Carol is a visceral portrait of the relationship between Therese Belivet, a lonely young artist, and Carol, a self-assured divorcee, set against the backdrop of 1950s New York. Highsmith first published Carol as The Price of Salt under a pseudonym in 1952 to avoid potential scandal around her own personal life.

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Challenge

After eloping to France with her lover Violet Trefusis and leaving behind their husbands and children, Sackville-West wrote Challenge, a fictional love story with many parallels to her own life. Although now considered a classic of LGBT+ literature Challenge lay unread for almost fifty years after the author stopped its publication in 1920 for fear of a scandal amongst her aristocratic peers.

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The Color Purple

Set in America’s Deep South, Alice Walker’s Pulitzer Prize winning novel is told through the words of of Celie, a young black woman born into segregation and poverty. The Color Purple is a heartbreaking story of abuse and exploitation, but also of Celie finding her own identity and discovering the ability to love.

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The Secret Diaries of Miss Anne Lister

The daughter of wealthy landowners in the 19th century, Anne Lister had to keep her real identity and relationships a secret from the world. Her recently discovered and decoded diaries reveal her fascinating secret life, and reveal how this remarkable woman was able to be a landowner, industrialist, traveller and lesbian in this most conservative of times.

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Orlando

Following it’s immortal namesake through three centuries of history, Orlando is an whimsical exploration of perceptions of gender and love through the ages. It’s also a love letter, written by Virginia Woolf to her long time female companion and fellow novelist Vita Sackville-West, who inspired the character of Orlando.

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Giovanni's Room

After David, a young American living in 1950s Paris meets the mysterious Giovanni in a bar the two begin an intense affair. When David's girlfriend returns three months later he is forced to choose between them, which has devestating consequences for them all. Highly controversial when it was first published in 1956 for it's portrayal of a gay relationship in mainsteam literature, James Baldwin’s tale of an ill fated love triangle is now considered a classic.

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