Released on 13 December 2018.

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Selection Day

TV tie-in

3.23 based on 1189 ratings & 212 reviews on Goodreads.com

Synopsis

Selection Day is a captivating, witty novel by the Man Booker Prize winning author of The White Tiger, Aravind Adiga.

'The most exciting novelist writing in English today' A. N. Wilson

One of the New York Times “100 Notable Books of 2017"

Manjunath Kumar is fourteen. He knows he is good at cricket - if not as good as his elder brother Radha. He knows that he fears and resents his domineering and cricket-obsessed father, admires his brilliantly talented sibling and is fascinated by the world of CSI and by curious and interesting scientific facts. But there are many things, about himself and about the world, that he doesn't know . . . Sometimes it seems as though everyone around him has a clear idea of who Manju should be, except Manju himself.

When Manju begins to get to know Radha's great rival, a boy as privileged and confident as Manju is not, everything in Manju's world begins to change and he is faced with decisions that will challenge both his sense of self and of the world around him . . .

In the media

[Adiga] has always been drawn to that gap between the glitter and gleam of India Shining and the violence, inequality and social misery that give a partial lie to the nation's desire to rebrand itself . . . [he] has written another snarling, witty state-of-the-nation address about a country in thrall to values that 19th-century moralists would have damned as "not cricket".
Observer
Adiga’s wit and raw sympathy will carry uninitiated readers beyond their ignorance of cricket . . . Adiga’s paragraphs bounce along like a ball hit hard down a dirt street . . . Adiga’s voice is so exuberant, his plotting so jaunty, that the sadness of this story feels as though it is accumulating just outside our peripheral vision
Washington Post
Supplies further proof that [Adiga's] Booker Prize . . . was no fluke. He is not merely a confident storyteller but also a thinker, a skeptic, a wily entertainer, a thorn in the side of orthodoxy and cant . . . What this novel offers is the sound of a serious and nervy writer working at near the top of his form. Like a star cricket batter, Mr. Adiga stands and delivers, as if for days.
New York Times