How to Survive a Plague

The Story of How Activists and Scientists Tamed AIDS

4.5 based on 126 ratings & 34 reviews on Goodreads.com
Picador

Publication date: 01.12.2016
ISBN: 9781509839414
Number of pages: 0

Synopsis

'This superbly written chronicle will stand as a towering work in its field' Sunday Times

'Inspiring, uplifting and necessary reading' - Steve Silberman author of Neurotribes, Financial Times

How to Survive a Plague by David France is the riveting, powerful and profoundly moving story of the AIDS epidemic and the grass-roots movement of activists, many of them facing their own life-or-death struggles, who grabbed the reins of scientific research to help develop the drugs that turned HIV from a mostly fatal infection to a manageable disease. Around the globe, the 15.8 million people taking anti-AIDS drugs today are alive thanks to their efforts.

Not since the publication of Randy Shilts's now classic And the Band Played On in 1987 has a book sought to measure the AIDS plague in such brutally human, intimate, and soaring terms.

Weaving together the stories of dozens of individuals, this is an insider's account of a pivotal moment in our history and one that changed the way that medical science is practised worldwide.

In the media

Flawless. Masterfully written, impeccably researched, and full of feeling for the living and dead heroes of the AIDS movement . . . No better person to write this book, which had to be written, creating a complete and correct record of this terrible story and its heroes.
Newsday
David France’s remarkable book . . . somehow manages to pack all the emotional power of [his] film with far more granular detail and narrative force. I doubt any book on this subject will be able to match its access to the men and women who lived and died through the trauma and the personal testimony that, at times, feels so real to someone who witnessed it that I had to put this volume down and catch my breath.
New York Times
Substantial and elegantly written, it is at once a deeply reported . . . AIDS history and an intimate memoir . . . The book naturally invites, and merits, comparison to Randy Shilts’s masterful And the Band Played On.
Boston Globe