Mountain Road, Late at Night

Alan Rossi

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06 February 2020
9781529002348
0 pages
Synopsis

'One to watch in 2020' – Irish Times

'An extraordinary debut for an extraordinary new talent' -- Frederick Barthelme, author of There Must Be Some Mistake

Nicholas and his wife April live in a remote cabin in the Blue Ridge Mountains with their four-year-old son, Jack. They keep their families at a distance, rejecting what their loved ones think of as 'normal'. In the early hours of a Wednesday morning, they are driving home from a party when their car crashes on a deserted road and they are killed.

As the couple's grieving relatives descend on the family home, they are forced to decide who will care for the child Nicholas and April left behind. Nicholas's brother, Nathaniel, and his wife Stephanie feel entirely unready to be parents but his mother and father have issues of their own. And April’s mother, Tammy, is driving across the country to claim her grandson.

Experiencing a few traumatic days in the minds of each family member, Alan Rossi's Mountain Road, Late at Night is a taut, nuanced and breathtaking look at what we do when everything goes wrong, and the frightening fact that life carries on, regardless. It is a gripping, affecting and extremely accomplished debut.

An enormously engaging novel. We don’t so much read it as live it with these troubled characters and the child, Jack, robbed of his parents by the shocking car crash on a lonely mountain road. This is a complex, deeply moving novel, given completely to the interrogation of its witnesses. An extraordinary debut for an extraordinary new talent

Frederick Barthelme, author of There Must Be Some Mistake

I was really moved by this extraordinary stream of consciousness accessing the deepest layers of four flawed people facing an unimaginably terrible situation. Compassionate and profound, this is the kind of novel that puts even difficult things into perspective

Isabel Costello, The Literary Sofa

Written in chapters that alternate between the character’s perspectives, this is a subtle examination of the effects of trauma and sudden loss, as well as a tense conflict between different views of parenting, what’s in the best interests of an orphaned child, and how it is influenced by one’s own upbringing. Through sharply drawn characters, Rossi achieves a clear-eyed and poignant view of a family in crisis

Sydney Morning Herald