Innocents and Others

3.5 based on 1594 ratings & 301 reviews on Goodreads.com
Picador

Publication date: 12.01.2017
ISBN: 9781509839131
Number of pages: 0

Synopsis

‘Spiotta is a wonder.’ – George Saunders, author of Lincoln in the Bardo

Meadow Mori and Carrie Wexler grew up together in Los Angeles, and both became film-makers.

Meadow makes challenging documentaries; Carrie makes successful feature films with a feminist slant. The two friends have everything in common - except their views on sex, power, movie-making and morality. And yet their loyalty trumps their different approaches to film and to life.

Until, one day, a mysterious woman with a unique ability to cold-call and seduce powerful men over the phone - not through sex, but through listening - becomes the subject of one of Meadow's documentaries. Her downfall, and what makes her so extraordinarily moving, is that she pretends to be someone she is not. The fallout from this challenges their friendship like nothing before.

Heart-breaking and insightful, Innocents and Others by Dana Spiotta is an astonishing novel about friendship, identity, loneliness and art.

In the media

Spiotta tackles the slippery nature of identity and the destructive pull of desire in her fourth novel-this time through the lens of film...captivating...moving...always thought provoking.
Publishers Weekly
The complex relationship among three women and the film world drives this tale of technology and its discontents […] A superb, spiky exploration of artistic motivation
Kirkus
Like Joan Didion and Don DeLillo, two legends to whom she's often compared, Dana Spiotta is a master of observing the way cultural artifacts take up so much space in our daily lives. Her latest novel takes place in the world of film in the 1980s, and two friends who've taken dramatically different paths in their careers as filmmakers . . . As the two friends' lives intersect with a woman named Jelly, who has anonymous yet romantic phone conversations with the Hollywood elite, it's clear how an undeniable trait of humanity is seek meaningful connection in an isolating world
Esquire (US)