Time Lived, Without Its Flow

Denise Riley

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03 October 2019
9781529017113
0 pages
Synopsis

'One of the most eloquent thinkers about our life in language' The Sunday Times

Time Lived, Without Its Flow is a beautiful, unflinching essay on the nature of grief from critically acclaimed poet Denise Riley. From the horrific experience of maternal grief Riley wrote her celebrated collection Say Something Back, a modern classic of British poetry. This essay is a companion piece to that work, looking at the way time stops when we lose someone suddenly from our lives.

The first half is formed of diary-like entries written by Riley after the news of her son’s death, the entries building to paint a live portrait of loss. The second half is a ruminative post script written some years later with Riley looking back at the experience philosophically and attempting to map through it a literature of consolation. Written in precise and exacting prose, with remarkable insight and grace this book will form kind counsel to all those living on in the wake of grief. A modern-day counterpart to C. S. Lewis’s A Grief Observed.

Published widely for the first time since its original limited release, this revised edition features a special introduction by Max Porter, author of Grief is A Thing With Feathers.

'Her writing is perfectly weighted, justifies its existence' - Guardian

She’s a poet whose work . . . never fails to convince new readers with its intelligence, wit and emotion

The Times

A terrific talent.

Poet Laureate Carol Ann Duffy

Her strengths are so varied: notice one quality you admire, and another follows hard behind. Riley is an enormously gifted writer.

Fiona Sampson, Guardian