What Belongs to You

3.78 based on 3001 ratings & 504 reviews on Goodreads.com
Picador

Publication date: 07.04.2016
ISBN: 9781447280538
Number of pages: 0

Synopsis

CHOSEN IN OVER FIFTY BEST BOOKS OF 2016 LISTS, FROM NINE COUNTRIES.
SHORTLISTED FOR THE DEBUT OF THE YEAR AWARD AT THE 2017 BRITISH BOOK AWARDS.

On an unseasonably warm autumn day, an American teacher enters a public bathroom beneath Sofia's National Palace of Culture. There he meets Mitko, a charismatic young hustler, and pays him for sex. He returns to Mitko again and again over the next few months, their relationship growing increasingly intimate and unnerving.

As he struggles to reconcile his longing with the anguish it creates, he's forced to grapple with his own fraught history: his formative experiences of love, his painful rejection by family and friends, and the difficulty of growing up as a gay man in southern America in the 1990s.

Startlingly erotic and immensely powerful, What Belongs to You tells an unforgettable story about the ways our pasts and cultures, our scars and shames can shape who we are and determine how we love.

Longlisted for the National Book Award in Fiction
A Finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction
A Finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Fiction

In the media

A powerful novel from a writer who seems destined to produce fine work in the years ahead, describing both the condition of loneliness and the insistent cravings of the flesh with precision and sensitivity. [Greenwell] never seeks to manipulate our emotions, but creates a narrative voice so enigmatic that one feels both affection and disdain for him simultaneously. Too often in fiction it becomes clear how an author wants the reader to feel, but Greenwell's character is too complex a creation for any easy judgments. And that is what will make both him and this novel particularly memorable
Irish Times
Sexually frank, deeply felt, and admirably constructed . . . [a] provocative tale
Booklist
Slim, eloquent and emotionally wrenching, this debut novel is a superb evocation of that curious state known as love . . . Greenwell's shimmering novel recounts an age-old story with such toughness and tenderness as to make it seem new: and that is an art in itself
RTÉ Guide