Move Fast and Break Things

How Facebook, Google, and Amazon Have Cornered Culture and What It Means For All Of Us

4 based on 1 ratings & 0 reviews on Goodreads.com
Macmillan Digital Audio

Publication date: 20.04.2017
ISBN: 9781509857395
Number of pages: 0

Synopsis

'The question isn't who's going to let me: it's who is going to stop me'

Google. Amazon. Facebook. The modern world is defined by vast digital monopolies turning ever-larger profits. Those of us who consume the content that feeds them are farmed for the purposes of being sold ever more products and advertising. Those that create the content - the artists, writers and musicians - are finding they can no longer survive in this unforgiving economic landscape.

But it didn't have to be this way.

This is the story of how a small number of ideologically driven libertarians took the utopian ideal of the internet and turned it into the copyright-mauling, competition-destroying, human-hating nightmare it has become. Their revolution began with a simple premise: to conquer the world, they would steal the value of art (as well as the value of everything else of importance to human beings) from its creators.

It is the story of a massive reallocation of revenue in which $50 billion a year has moved from the creators and owners of content to the monopoly platforms. And if you think that's got nothing to do with you, their next move is to come after your jobs.

Move Fast and Break Things is a call to arms to wake up, to say that is enough is enough, to call out the perpetrators of almost inconceivable large-scale cultural theft, and to demand that we do everything in our power to create a different future.

In the media

Jonathan Taplin's Move Fast and Break Things, a rock and roll memoir cum internet history cum artists' manifesto, provides a bracing antidote to corporate triumphalism - and a reminder that musicians and writers need a place at the tech table and, more to the point, a way to make a decent living
Jeffrey Toobin, author of American Heiress
Move Fast and Break Things goes on my bookshelf beside a few other indispensable signposts in the maze of life in the 21st Century--The Technological Society by Jacques Ellul, The Image by Daniel Boorstin, The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction by Walter Benjamin, The Medium is the Message by Marshall McLuhan, The Media Monopoly by Ben Bagdikian, Christ and the Media by Malcolm Muggeridge, and Future Shock by Alvin Toffler. I pray the deepest and highest prayer I can get to that this clarion warning is heeded. The survival of our species is at stake
T Bone Burnett, Oscar-Winning Songwriter, soundtrack and record producer
Jonathan Taplin, more than anyone I know, can articulate the paralyzing complexities that have arisen from the intertwining of the tech and music industries. He counters the catastrophic implications for musicians with solutions and inspiration for a renaissance. He shows the way for artists to reclaim and reinvent subversion, rather than be in servitude to Big Tech. Every musician and every creator should read this book.
Rosanne Cash, Grammy-winning Singer and Songwriter