Bluebird is excited to announce it will be publishing Tin Can Cook by anti-poverty campaigner and bestselling cookbook author Jack Monroe.

 

Tin Can Cook will publish on 30th May 2019 and will bring together 75 recipes that are easy to rustle up from tinned and dried ingredients. With the growing number of people using foodbanks in the UK, Jack’s book comes at exactly the right time. This simple and affordable book will be a lifesaver for those who have to feed themselves on a shoestring budget, but who don’t want to skimp on nutritious, appetizing and varied meals. Regardless of how much readers usually spend on their weekly shop, they will be surprised and delighted to find how many delicious and incredibly simple dishes you can create with the tins that might otherwise end up unused at the back of the store cupboard.

 

Recipes include tinned spud fishcakes, sardine and tomato soup, tindade, a twist on the French classic brandade and many more delicious and creative recipes. With her expertise and experience of living on the poverty line, Jack shows us that eating well is not restricted to those who can afford premium ingredients, but a right for all, whatever the budget constraints.

 

Jack has recently enjoyed great success with her third book Cooking on a Bootstrap and her upcoming recipe collection Vegan on a Bootstrap is scheduled for release in December next year.

Jack Monroe was voted Food Personality of the Year in the 2018 Observer Food Monthly Awards and given the 2013 Fortnum and Mason Judges' Choice Award for the impact that her blog, A Girl Called Jack, has had. She is now a well-known campaigner against hunger and poverty in the UK, weekly recipe columnist for the Guardian, and winner of a Women of the Year award in 2014. She is author of the cookbooks A Girl Called Jack, A Year in 120 Recipes and Cooking on a Bootstrap.

 

Jack Monroe says: “ I've been writing recipes from tins for around six years now; and it is frequently met with amusement and disdain from my peers. But I'm fascinated by our relationships with tinned food, and what those tins say about us. Our abilities, our fears, our emergencies, and our comfort zones. At the time of writing this book, there are around 400 registered foodbanks in the UK, feeding 1.5million people, and those parcels are made primarily of tinned goods. I know, because I was a food bank user, and it was out of those parcels that I started to write recipes online.

 

I decided to make it my mission to create restaurant-quality, beautiful, desirable meals, from my local corner store tins and supermarket basics ranges. These recipes are designed for everyone; from those with very little confidence and cooking ability, the smallest of kitchens, the scantest of equipment, to the gourmands, the bon vivants, and the curious among us. Grab a tin opener, and an open mind, and let Tin Can Cook surprise you - the end results, in every single one of these recipes, is so much more than the sum of its parts. I'm proud of every single recipe in this book; and I hope you will be too.”