Shattered Minds

Laura Lam

3.81 based on 329 ratings & 111 reviews on Goodreads.com
See more book details
08 February 2018
9781447286929
400 pages
Synopsis

Laura Lam's Shattered Minds stars a female 'Dexter' with a drug problem and a conscience, in a terrifying near-future where technology rules our lives and haunts our dreams.

She can uncover the truth, if she defeats her demons

Ex-neuroscientist Carina struggles with a drug problem, her conscience, and urges to kill. She satisfies her cravings in dreams, fuelled by the addictive drug ‘Zeal’. Now she’s heading for self-destruction – until she has a vision of a dead girl.

Sudice Inc. damaged Carina when she worked on their sinister brain-mapping project, causing her violent compulsions. And this girl was a similar experiment. When Carina realizes the vision was planted by her old colleague Mark, desperate for help to expose the company, she knows he’s probably dead. Her only hope is to unmask her nemesis – or she’s next.

To unlock the secrets Mark hid in her mind, she’ll need a group of specialist hackers. Dax is one
of them, a doctor who can help Carina fight her addictions. If she holds on to her humanity, they
might even have a future together. But first she must destroy her adversary – before it changes us and our society, forever.

I really enjoyed this visceral, streetwise look into a future of custom physiques and hackable minds. The book's dry, cyberpunk sensibilities are balanced by a rich and flawed anti-hero, and intriguing questions about the blurred lines between code and psyche.

Adrian Walker, author of End of the World Running Club

I really enjoyed Shattered Minds . . . a noir cyberpunk thriller along the lines of Neuromancer

Neal Asher

In Shattered Minds Laura Lam combines William Gibson’s noirish cyberpunk vibe with Kim Stanley Robinson’s social concern and world-building to produce a gripping, fast-paced hi-tech thriller peopled by flawed but believable characters . . . The novel works as a tense techno-thriller, as state-of-the-art extrapolative SF, and as a moving exploration of character in which even the bad guys are portrayed with sympathy

Guardian