To welcome in the new year we’ve curated an edit of our favourite poems for New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day, from famous poems such as 'Auld Lang Syne', to lesser known works about welcoming in the new year.

 

Auld Lang Syne 

By Robert Burns


Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
   And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
   And auld lang syne!

   For auld lang syne, my dear,
   For auld lang syne.
   We’ll tak a cup o’ kindness yet,
   For auld lang syne.

And surely ye’ll be your pint stowp!
   And surely I’ll be mine!
And we’ll tak a cup o’ kindness yet,
   For auld lang syne.

We twa hae run about the braes,
   And pou’d the gowans fine;
But we’ve wander’d mony a weary fit,
   Sin’ auld lang syne.

We twa hae paidl’d in the burn,
   Frae morning sun till dine;
But seas between us braid hae roar’d
   Sin’ auld lang syne.

And there’s a hand, my trusty fere!
   And gie’s a hand o’ thine!
And we’ll tak a right gude-willie waught,
   For auld lang syne.

   For auld lang syne, my dear,
   For auld lang syne.
   We’ll tak a cup o’ kindness yet,
   For auld lang syne.

From A Poem for Every Night of the Year

 

Good Riddance, But Now What?

By Ogden Nash 

 

Come, children, gather round my knee;
Something is about to be.
Tonight’s December thirty-first,
Something is about to burst.
The clock is crouching, dark and small,
Like a time bomb in the hall.
Hark! It’s midnight, children dear.
Duck! Here comes another year.

From Read Me 2: A Poem For Every Day Of The Year

 

Ring Out, Wild Bells (from In Memoriam)

By Lord Alfred Tennyson

 

Ring out, wild bells, to the wild sky,
The flying cloud, the frosty light:
The year is dying in the night;
Ring out, wild bells, and let him die.
Ring out the old, ring in the new,
Ring, happy bells, across the snow:
The year is going, let him go;
Ring out the false, ring in the true.
Ring out the grief that saps the mind
For those that here we see no more;
Ring out the feud of rich and poor,
Ring in redress to all mankind.
Ring out a slowly dying cause,
And ancient forms of party strife;
Ring in the nobler modes of life,
With sweeter manners, purer laws.
Ring out the want, the care, the sin,
The faithless coldness of the times;
Ring out, ring out my mournful rhymes
But ring the fuller minstrel in.
Ring out false pride in place and blood,
The civic slander and the spite;
Ring in the love of truth and right,
Ring in the common love of good.
Ring out old shapes of foul disease;
Ring out the narrowing lust of gold;
Ring out the thousand wars of old,
Ring in the thousand years of peace.
Ring in the valiant man and free,
The larger heart, the kindlier hand;
Ring out the darkness of the land,
Ring in the Christ that is to be. 

From A Poem For Every Day Of The Year

 

Promise

By Jackie Kay

 

Remember, the time of year
when the future appears
like a blank sheet of paper
a clean calendar, a new chance.
On thick white snow
You vow fresh footprints
then watch them go
with the wind’s hearty gust.
Fill your glass. Here’s tae us. Promises
made to be broken, made to last.

From A Poem For Every Day Of The Year

 

Poem for a New Year

By Matt Goodfellow

 

Something’s moving in,
I hear the weather in the wind,
sense the tension of a sheep-field
and the pilgrimage of fins. 
Something’s not the same,
I taste the sap and feel the grain,
hear the rolling of the rowan
ringing, singing in a change.
Something’s set to start,
there’s meadow-music in the dark
and the clouds that shroud the mountain
slowly, softly start to part.

From A Poem For Every Day Of The Year

 

The New Year

By Anon. 

 

I am the little New Year, ho, ho ! 
Here I come tripping it over the snow.
Shaking my bells with a merry din –
So open your doors and let me in!

Presents I bring for each and all –
Big folks, little folks, short and tall;
Each one from me a treasure may win –
So open your doors and let me in!

Some shall have silver and some shall have gold,
Some shall have new clothes and some shall have old;
Some shall have brass and some shall have tin – 
So open your doors and let me in!

Some shall have water and some shall have milk,
Some shall have satin and some shall have silk!
But each from me a present may win – 
So open your doors and let me in!

From Read Me 2 A Poem For Every Day Of The Year