David Baldacci picks his five favourite crime books

13 July 2016

By Pan Macmillan

From classic crime novels to hard-boiled detective fiction, David Baldacci picks his favourite crime books of all time.



The Big Sleep by Raymond Chandler

Los Angeles PI Philip Marlowe is working for the Sternwood family. Old man Sternwood, crippled and wheelchair-bound, is being given the squeeze by a blackmailer and he wants Marlowe to make the problem go away. But with Sternwood's two wild, devil-may-care daughters prowling LA's seedy backstreets, Marlowe's got his work cut out – and that's before he stumbles over the first corpse...

Find out more



Postmortem by Patricia Cornwell

A serial killer is on the loose in Richmond, Virginia. Three women have died, brutalised and strangled in their own bedroom. There is no pattern: the killer appears to strike at random – but always early on Saturday mornings. So when Dr Kay Scarpetta, chief medical officer, is awakened at 2.33 am, she knows the news is bad: there is a fourth victim. And she fears now for those that will follow unless she can dig up new forensic evidence to aid the police. But not everyone is pleased to see a woman in this powerful job. Someone may even want to ruin her career and reputation...

Find out more



The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Supernatural hounds, a family curse, a mysterious cipher and the return of a deadly enemy... Sherlock Holmes will have to utilize every skill he has to solve the two classic mysteries collected here. The Hound of the Baskervilles sees Holmes and Dr Watson travel to the misty wilds of Dartmoor to confront a devilish apparition.

Find out more



L.A. Requiem by Robert Crais

Karen Garcia is missing and her father doesn't trust the cops – he wants someone he knows on the case. So he enlists the help of Elvis Cole and Joe Pike.

It seems that Karen is the latest victim of a distinctive serial killer and the police are determined to pin her death, and four others, on the witness who found her body. Cole doesn't believe the man has the guts to murder, and with his partner and the police at each other's throats, it's down to him to find the connection that will reveal the killer. But nailing the murderer means choosing between the two people he cares most about...

Find out more



Strangers on a Train
by Patricia Highsmith

The psychologists would call it folie a deux...

'Bruno slammed his palms together. "Hey! Cheeses, what an idea! I kill your wife and you kill my father! We meet on a train, see, and nobody knows we know each other! Perfect alibis! Catch?'''

From this moment, almost against his conscious will, Guy Haines is trapped in a nightmare of shared guilt and an insidious merging of personalities.

Find out more


 

You may also like

The Hound of the Baskervilles & The Valley of Fear

You may also like